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 Recent Examples and Warnings of fraud/scam activty

July 23, 2014
Consumers in the Chicagoland area, including West Suburban Bank customers have reported a recent phone scam in which they receive a computer-generated call stating their debit card has been restricted and to enter their 16 digit card number to re-activate their card.  This is known as a “phone phishing scam.” These fraudulent individuals want you, the customer, to enter in your card number in order to steal the information. West Suburban Bank does not request this type of information from our customers. Under no circumstance should you enter your card number, or give out any of your personal information.  If you have any questions or have provided your West Suburban Bank card number in this scam, please call us immediately at 630-652-2000.

 

April 10, 2014
Heartbleed Bug
News sources are reporting information regarding the "Heartbleed Bug," which can compromise the encryption of vulnerable websites and allow personal information to be compromised.
West Suburban Bank’s Online Banking, Bill Pay and Mobile Banking systems are SAFE from the Heartbleed Bug. 

Consumers can help protect themselves and their personal information by using unique passwords on other websites visited.  Credentials could be compromised if consumers reuse their passwords in more than one site. 

WSB suggests customers adopt the following password security best practices:

  • Change your password frequently
  • Use a password that contains at least 8 characters
  • Include, at a minimum, letters and numbers in your password
  • Store passwords securely
  • Don't leave passwords where others can find them
  • Never share your password
  • Never use the same password in multiple sites

As your financial partner, we feel it is important to notify you of potential fraudulent activity and the latest scams that may put you and your sensitive information at risk. As the level of doing business electronically increases, so does the level of criminal activity on the internet. Criminals attempt to gain control of your assets by acquiring your personal information through the internet. Protect yourself by becoming aware of the methods criminals use to collect your personal information. We encourage you to become familiar will all the types of scams listed on this page. Please visit this page regularly as we are committed to updating this information as soon as we become aware of any type of new threat.

 

March 2014

IRS Warns of New Email Phishing Scheme Falsely Claiming to be from the Taxpayer Advocate Service


WASHINGTON —The Internal Revenue Service today warned consumers to be on the lookout for a new email phishing scam. The emails appear to be from the IRS Taxpayer Advocate Service and include a bogus case number.


The fake emails may include the following message: “Your reported 2013 income is flagged for review due to a document processing error. Your case has been forwarded to the Taxpayer Advocate Service for resolution assistance. To avoid delays processing your 2013 filing contact the Taxpayer Advocate Service for resolution assistance.”
Recipients are directed to click on links that supposedly provide information about the "advocate" assigned to their case or that let them "review reported income." The links lead to web pages that solicit personal information.


Taxpayers who get these messages should not respond to the email or click on the links. Instead, they should forward the scam emails to the IRS at phishing@irs.gov. For more information, visit the IRS's Report Phishing web page.


The Taxpayer Advocate Service is a legitimate IRS organization that helps taxpayers resolve federal tax issues that have not been resolved through the normal IRS channels. The IRS, including TAS, does not initiate contact with taxpayers by email, texting or any social media.
For more on scams to guard against see the "Dirty Dozen" list on IRS.gov.

 

 

May 17, 2013

Phone Phishing Scam

 

Some WSB customers have reported a recent phone scam in which they received a recorded message stating their debit card has been de-activated or has been compromised and they need to call a number to re-activate their cards. The caller ID of the caller may display your number.  This is known as a “phone phishing scam”. These fraudulent individuals want you, the customer, to call the number back and enter in your debit card number and your pin to steal this information. West Suburban Bank would not request this type of information from our customers. Under no circumstance should you return the call and/or give out any of your personal information.  If you have provided any account information in response to this scam, please stop by your local branch or call us immediately at 630/652-2000 to prevent fraudulent activity. In addition, the Federal Trade Commission (FTC) should be contacted at 877/382-4357.

 

JUNE 8, 2012

Phishing email purported to be from EnFact

 

We have become aware of phishing email attempts that references the “eNFact” product. The email directs recipients to click on a link that takes them to a site that may install malicious software.  Do not open it or click on the link.  The phishing attack is contained in a fraudulent email identical or similar to the one that follows:

 

From: eNFACT Notifications [mailto:noreply@enfactnotifications.com]
To: Recipients
Subject: eNFACT Case #29018

 

To protect your account, we monitor your ATM and debit card transactions for potentially fraudulent activity which may include a sudden change in locale (such as when a U.S.-issued card is used unexpectedly overseas), a sudden string of costly purchases, or any pattern associated with new fraud trends around the world.


An eNFACT Case was generated for the cardholder below:
Transaction 1 Information:
A charge on 10/23/2011 in the amount of $438.09 in ITALY Transaction Score: 981
Transaction 2 Information:
A charge on 10/23/2011 in the amount of $513.14 in ITALY Transaction Score: 918
Transaction 3 Information:
A charge on 10/22/2011 in the amount of $0.02 at O RANCH Transaction Score: 37


The eNFACT Case is generated when a suspect transaction is detected. If this transaction was not initiated by you as the credit card holder please follow the steps as shown at: http://(malicious website name)


Please be sure to complete the Case Resolution Notification (CRN) Form at
(http://(malicious website name). If you have any questions, or would like additional information pertaining to this eNFACT Case, please contact the Card Processing Center at 800-xxx-xxxx.

 

 


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

DECEMBER 21, 2012

 

Alert from the Better Business Bureau:

 

Fake Better Business Bureau Complaint Emails Are Scams Phishing for Personal, Corporate Information

 

Chicago, IL- December 20, 2011 - An email scam using the Better Business Bureau's (BBB) name and logo continues to proliferate across North America, and even to some overseas addresses. Most of the emails carry the well-known BBB torch logo and may come with the subject line "Complaint from your customers." The emails have a link or an attachment containing malicious phishing malware that steals information, often with devastating results to businesses and private citizens.

 

"While the Internet has many benefits; misrepresentations and scams like this are one of the ugly features of the Internet," stated Steve Bernas, president & CEO of the Better Business Bureau serving Chicago and Northern Illinois.

 

Because of experiences such as this one, the BBB has updated its advice and recommends the following to anyone who receives the email:

  • Do not open any attachments.
  • Do not click on any links.
  • Delete the email from your inbox, and then delete it again from your trash or recycling folder.
  • Run a full system scan using reputable virus software.

Due to the virulent nature of the virus, the recommendation is for everyone who receives it to do the scan. In offices or homes that are networked, all computers should be scanned.

Bernas noted that the disgusting element of this scam is that the perpetrators are likely targeting businesses, individuals and other organizations that combat this type of activity.

"This scam is unusual in that it is very wide ranging and continuing," explained Bernas. "The BBB national office is working with federal law enforcement agencies to identify the perpetrator of this fraud, and is also looking into other measures it can take to help prevent future phishing scams from spreading."

 

If you receive an email saying your business has a complaint filed against it with BBB, there are several things you can do to determine if it is a fake notification:

  • Look for typos, grammatical errors, etc. in the text that could indicate it originated overseas.
  • Check to see who it says is the sender. Authentic BBB complaints go out from the local BBBs, not from the headquarters office.
  • Hover your mouse over the link to see if its destination is really a bbb.org address.
  • Copy and paste the link into Notepad (not Word). Notepad does not support html, so if the link is a fake bbb.org address, the real link will show up.
  • If you still are not sure, go to www.bbb.org to find your local BBB, and send them a new email to ask if you have a complaint (do not Reply to the email you received, or forward it to them). They have been swamped with requests, so you may not hear back immediately.

Chris Garver, Chief Information Officer at the Council of Better Business Bureaus, recommends that all domain owners set up a sender policy framework (SPF) and set their spam filter to use it. "Using the SPF standard helps fight spam and phishing attacks by allowing your email servers to verify whether an email is legitimate...or not," he says.

 

If you have received one of these emails, please send it directly to the BBB phishing deactivation team at:phishing@cscprotectsbrands.com

 

For more consumer safety tips, visit www.bbb.org 

 

July 19, 2011

 

SUBJECT:

Fraudulent "ACH and Wire transfers" E-Mails

Summary:

Fraudulent e-mails claiming to be from the FDIC are in circulation.

 

The Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation (FDIC) has received numerous reports of fraudulent e-mails that have the appearance of being from the FDIC.


The e-mails appear to be sent from various "@fdic.gov" e-mail addresses, such as "protection@fdic.gov," "admin@administration.fdic.gov," or "service@admin.fdic.gov."


They have various subject lines such as "Update for your banking account," "ACH and Wire transfers disabled," and "Banking security update."


The fraudulent messages state:


"Dear clients,

 

Your account ACH and Wire transactions have been temporarily suspended for your Security, due to the expiration of your security version. To download and install the newest Updates, follow this link. As soon as it is set up, your transaction abilities will be fully restored. Best regards, Online security department, Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation."


These e-mails and links are fraudulent and were not sent by the FDIC. Recipients should consider these e-mails an attempt to collect personal or confidential information, or to load malicious software onto end users' computers. Recipients should NOT access the link provided within the body of the e-mails and should NOT install any related files or software updates.


Financial institutions and consumers should be aware that these fraudulent e-mails may be modified over time with other subject lines, sender names, and narratives. The FDIC does not directly contact bank customers, nor does the FDIC request bank customers to install software upgrades.


Information about counterfeit items, cyber-fraud incidents, and other fraudulent activity may be forwarded to the FDIC's Cyber-Fraud and Financial Crimes Section, 3501 North Fairfax Drive, CH-11034, Arlington, Virginia 22226, or transmitted electronically to alert@fdic.gov. Questions related to federal deposit insurance or consumer issues should be submitted to the FDIC using an online form that can be accessed at http://www2.fdic.gov/starsmail/index.php.


For your reference, FDIC Special Alerts may be accessed from the FDIC's Web site at www.fdic.gov/news/news/SpecialAlert/2011/index.html. To learn how to automatically receive FDIC Special Alerts through e-mail, please visit www.fdic.gov/about/subscriptions/index.html.

 

 

Sandra L. Thompson

Director
Division of Risk Management Supervision

 

 

July 7, 2011

Visa Offer Helpful Security Tips

 

Visa (NYSE: V) is offering consumers tips on how to protect themselves from card fraud. The website www.VisaSecuritySense.com provides helpful information for cardholders on how to protect their account information and resolve unauthorized card use.

 

 

June 22, 2011

PHISHING ATTEMPT REGARDING DEACTIVATED CARDS


West Suburban Bank (WSB) has received several reports from customers that have received phone call from an automated call center stating their “ATM” card has been deactivated and to call a phone number provided to reactivate it.  When this number is called an automated voice response system asks for the card number, expiration date and PIN.  Theses texts are a scam, so please do not call the phone number and provide any card information.   In these cases West Suburban Bank is not mentioned in the automated message.  WSB would not ask customers to provide card information over the phone.  Any WSB customers that provide card info in response to this scam should contact us immediately to prevent fraudulent activity.  In addition, the Federal Trade Commission (FTC) should be contacted at (847) 382-4357.    

 

To report suspicious text messages, please forward information about the text to abuse@westsuburbanbank.com or call West Suburban bank at 630-652-2000.

 


June 3, 2011

FRAUDULENT E-MAIL CLAIMING TO BE FROM THE FDIC

 

 

 

 

 

The Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation (FDIC) has received numerous reports of fraudulent e-mails that have the appearance of being from the FDIC.


The e-mails appear to be sent from various "@fdic.gov" e-mail addresses, such as "subscriptions@fdic.gov," "alert@fdic.gov," or "accounts@fdic.gov."


They have subject lines that read: "FDIC: Your business account" or "FDIC: About Your Business Account."


The e-mails are addressed to "Business Customer" or "Business Owner" and state "We have important information about your bank" or "…financial institution." They then ask recipients to "Please click here to find details."


They conclude with, "This includes information on the acquiring bank (if applicable), how your accounts and loans are affected, and how vendors can file claims against the receivership."


These e-mails and the link included are fraudulent and were not sent by the FDIC. Recipients should consider the intent of these e-mails as an attempt to collect personal or confidential information, or to load malicious software onto end users' computers. Recipients should NOT access the link provided within the body of the e-mails and should NOT, under any circumstances, provide any personal financial information through this media.


Financial institutions and consumers should be aware that other subject lines and modifications to the e-mails may occur over time. The FDIC does not directly contact consumers in this manner nor does the FDIC request personal financial information from consumers.


For your reference, FDIC Special Alerts may be accessed from the FDIC's Website at www.fdic.gov/news/news/SpecialAlert/2011/index.html. To learn how to automatically receive FDIC Special Alerts through email, please visit www.fdic.gov/about/subscriptions/index.html.


Questions related to federal deposit insurance or consumer issues should be submitted to the FDIC using an online form that can be accessed at http://www2.fdic.gov/starsmail/index.php.

 

 

Sandra L. Thompson

Director
Division of Supervision and Consumer Protection

 

 

 

May 4, 2011

FRAUDULENT TEXT MESSAGES CLAIMING TO BE FROM WEST SUBURBAN BANK

 

West Suburban Bank (WSB) has received several reports from customers and non-customers that have received text messages on their cell phones claiming to be from WSB.  The text states that their WSB card has been deactivated and to call the phone number provided on the text.  When this number is called an automated voice response system asks for the card number, expiration date and PIN.  Theses texts are a scam, so please do not call the phone number and provide any card information.   

 

To report suspicious text messages, please forward information about the text to abuse@westsuburbanbank.com.

 

 

 

March 24, 2011

FRAUDULENT EMAILS CLAIMING TO BE FROM NACHA

 

Further to its notice of February 22, 2011, NACHA – The Electronic Payments Association has received reports that individuals and/or companies continue to receive fraudulent emails that have the appearance of having been sent from NACHA. These emails vary in content and appear to be transmitted from email addresses associated with the NACHA domain (@nacha.org). Some bear the name of fictitious NACHA employees and/or departments.
 
NACHA itself does not process nor touch the ACH transactions that flow to and from organizations and financial institutions. NACHA does not send communications to persons or organizations about individual ACH transactions that they originate or receive.

Be aware that phishing emails frequently have attachments and/or links to Web pages that host malicious code and software. Do not open attachments or follow Web links in unsolicited emails from unknown parties or from parties with whom you do not normally communicate, or that appear to be known but are suspicious or otherwise unusual.
  
If malicious code is detected or suspected on a computer, consult with a computer security or anti-virus specialist to remove malicious code or re-install a clean image of the computer system.  Always use anti-virus software and ensure that the virus signatures are automatically updated. Ensure that the computer operating systems and common software application security patches are installed and current.

Additional information and guidance on phishing is available from the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation (FDIC)


It is important to note that West Suburban Bank’s Online Banking application is designed to protect you and your sensitive information, and as a precaution the system will automatically time out after a set period of inactivity. When this occurs, we will make use of a message to alert you of inactivity.  West Suburban Bank does not use pop-up windows to request customer’s account information, conduct any type of surveys or to market any of our products or services. See below for additional information on messages you will receive from us while accessing your accounts online.

 

Messages you will receive from WSB

 

Session Inactivity
If you remain logged into Online Banking and you do not interact with the system for a set period of time, you will receive a message from us that states your session has timed out.  This message is displayed as part of your current browser window; we do not display this message within a “new” browser window (i.e. like a popup ad).   This prompt does ask you to enter your Passcode to re-activate your session.  It does not ask you to re-enter your username.

 

Bill Payment Timeout
Additionally, while using our Bill Payment service, if you do not interact with the system for a set period of time, you will receive a message from us that prompts you to click “OK” to continue using the Bill Pay service.  Clicking OK removes the message; it does not ask you for any additional information.   If you ignore this message, once you attempt to access the system, you will be prompted with the Session Inactivity message.

 

 

December 14, 2010

 

The United States Postal Inspection Service Warns Consumers of Spam


BOGUS DELIVERY MESSAGES E-MAILED TO POSTAL CUSTOMERS

 

Some postal customers are receiving bogus e-mails about a package delivery.  The e-mails contain a link that, when opened, installs a malicious virus that can steal personal information from your PC.

 

The e-mails claim to be from the U.S. Postal Service and contain fraudulent information about an attempted or intercepted package delivery.  You are instructed to click on a link to find out when you can expect your delivery.  But Postal Inspectors warn: DO NOT CLICK ON THE LINK!

 

Like most viruses sent by e-mail, clicking on the link will activate a virus that can steal information-such as your user name, password, and financial account information.

 

What to do?  Simply delete the message without taking any further action.  The Postal Inspection Service is working hard to resolve the issue and shut down the malicious program.

 

If you have questions about a delivery or wish to report spam, please call 1-800-ASK-USPS.

 

 

August 31, 2010


Consumers in the Chicagoland area have reported a recent phone scam in which they received  voice mail messages stating their debit card has been de-activated and they need to call a number to re-activate their cards. This is known as a “phone phishing scam.” These fraudulent individuals want you, the customer, to call the number back and enter in your debit card number as well as your pin to steal the information. West Suburban Bank would not request this type of information from our customers. Under no circumstance should you return the call and/or give out any of your personal information.  If you do receive this type of phone call or message or have any questions please call us immediately at 630/652-2200.

 

Wire Transfer Scam: Lottery/Sweepstakes
The victim receive letters in the mail pretending to be from Readers Digest, Publisher’s Clearing House, or a foreign lottery informing them they won thousands of dollars.  The letter would be accompanied by a check representing a portion of the total winnings. In order to get the rest, the victim was told to deposit the check and then wire hundreds of dollars back to the scammers supposedly to cover the taxes or other bogus fees.  However the check was fraudulent and returned unpaid and the victims would never receive any prize.

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Wire Transfer Scam: Mystery Shopper 
Consumers thought they could make extra money as a mystery shopper; evaluating customer service experiences at various stores, restaurants and wire transfer outlet.  Unsuspecting victims receive a real-looking check to cover expenses and asked to evaluate their experiences at a few stores as well as a money-wiring service such as Western Union by wiring money back to the scammers.  The victim deposits the check at their bank and wires out the money to the scammers.  The fraudulent check is later returned unpaid and victim is out hundreds or thousands of dollars.

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November 13, 2009 - Phishing Alert!
 West Suburban Bank has been made aware of an e-mail being sent to random individuals/companies with the subject title "Rejected ACH Transaction." This e-mail appears to have come from NACHA, the Electronic Payments Association, stating that there is a problem with an ACH transaction they have originated. The e-mail includes a link which directs the receiver to a fake web page which appears to look like the NACHA website, and contains a link which could contain a virus with malware. We have been told this e-mail did not originate from NACHA, and the website is not NACHA's website. If you receive this type of e-mail, do not click on the link.

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For additional information regarding this phishing email, please go to:www.nacha.org.


West Suburban Bank, Member FDIC.Equal Housing Lender
Serving DuPage, Kane, Kendall and Will Counties, Illinois.